Should you still get the COVID-19 vaccine if you were treated with monoclonal antibodies?

If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, there is no need to delay getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Do I need the COVID-19 vaccine if I still have antibodies?

Yes, the COVID-19 vaccines are recommended, even if you had COVID-19.



What are monoclonal antibodies used for during the COVID-19 pandemic?


Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-made proteins that mimic the immune system's ability to fight off harmful pathogens such as viruses, like SARS-CoV-2. And like other infectious organisms, SARS-CoV-2 can mutate over time, resulting in certain treatments not working against certain variants such as omicron.



Should you get the Covid vaccine if you have an autoimmune disease?

The American College of Rheumatology COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Guidance recommends that people with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic disease (which includes lupus) get the vaccine unless they have an allergy to an ingredient in the vaccine.

What medication is not recommended before vaccinations for COVID-19?

It is not recommended you take over-the-counter medicine – such as ibuprofen, aspirin, or acetaminophen – before vaccination for the purpose of trying to prevent vaccine-related side effects. It is not known how these medications might affect how well the vaccine works.


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What are some medications that are safe to take with the COVID-19 vaccine?

Taking one of the following medications is not, on its own, a reason to avoid getting your COVID-19 vaccination:

• Over-the-counter medications (non-prescription)
• Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (naproxen, ibuprofen, aspirin, etc.)
• Acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc.)



Should you avoid pain relievers before getting the COVID-19 vaccine?


Because of this uncertainty, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommend avoiding pain relievers and fever reducers before getting any vaccine.



Are people with autoimmune diseases considered high risk for COVID-19?


Researchers have reported higher rates of severe COVID-19 and death in people with autoimmune disease than in the general population. It is unclear whether this is attributable to the autoimmune disease, the immunosuppressive medications taken to treat it, or both.



Can COVID-19 cause an autoimmune disease?

Widespread and long-term inflammation during severe COVID-19 may cause the immune system to produce antibodies to pieces of the virus it wouldn't normally recognize. Some of those pieces might resemble human proteins enough to trigger the production of autoantibodies.



Are you at risk of experiencing an autoimmune disease flare-up from COVID-19 vaccine?

There is a risk that flare-ups may occur. That being said, it has been observed that people living with autoimmune and inflammatory conditions are at higher risk of experiencing severe symptoms from a COVID-19 infection.

Are antibodies beneficial during the COVID-19 pandemic?


When reinfections or breakthrough infections happen, having antibodies plays an important role in helping prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death. For many diseases, including COVID-19, antibodies are expected to decrease or “wane” over time.



What is a monoclonal antibody?

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced molecules that act as substitute antibodies that can restore, enhance or mimic the immune system's attack on cells.

What does it mean to have antibodies during the COVID-19 pandemic?


When you are infected with a virus or bacteria, your immune system makes antibodies specifically to fight it. Your immune system can also safely learn to make antibodies through vaccination. Once you have antibodies to a particular disease, they provide some protection from that disease.



Can you get COVID-19 if you already had it and have antibodies?


It is important to remember that some people with antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 may become infected after vaccination (vaccine breakthrough infection) or after recovering from a past infection (reinfected).



Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine after recovering from the infection?


People who have COVID-19 should wait to receive any vaccine, including a COVID-19 vaccine, until after they recover and complete their isolation period.



How long do COVID-19 antibodies last?

At this time, it is unknown for how long antibodies persist following infection and if the presence of antibodies confers protective immunity.

Are long term side effects possible with the COVID-19 vaccine?


Benefits of Vaccination Outweigh the Risks Serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unusual following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination.



What are some of the lingering effects of COVID-19?


If you contracted COVID-19, you might still be experiencing this phenomenon long after the acute infection has passed. Long COVID presents as persistent symptoms ranging from mild headaches and general malaise to more serious problems such as extreme fatigue, difficulty concentrating and shortness of breath.



What other illnesses are caused by coronaviruses?

Coronavirus is a family of viruses that can cause respiratory illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Can taking immunosuppressants increase my chances of getting COVID-19?

And medicines called immunosuppressants may make you more likely to have serious complications from the virus, as can your autoimmune disorder itself

Which groups of people are at increased risks of severe illness from COVID-19?

Among adults, the risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults at highest risk. Severe illness means that the person with COVID-19 may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die. People of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are also at increased risk for severe illness from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Are people with rheumatoid arthritis more at risk for COVID-19?

If you have rheumatoid arthritis (RA), you're more likely to get certain infections. That means you may have a higher chance of getting COVID-19. If you do get sick, your symptoms could be more serious than someone who doesn't have RA. Some medicines you take might also make infections more likely.

Is it safe to take Tylenol or Ibuprofen before a COVID-19 vaccine?

Because of the lack of high-quality studies on taking NSAIDs or Tylenol before getting a vaccine, the CDC and other similar health organizations recommend not taking Advil or Tylenol beforehand.

Can taking Tylenol (acetaminophen) before the COVID-19 vaccine reduce its effectiveness?


Because taking over-the-counter painkillers before getting vaccinated may reduce the responsiveness of your immune system and therefore weaken the effectiveness of the vaccine, the CDC does not recommend taking Tylenol or ibuprofen before getting the COVID-19 vaccine.



Why should you try not take painkillers after taking the COVID-19 vaccine?

Experiencing mild fever, chills, headache, or fatigue from the COVID-19 vaccine means that your immune system is kicking in the way it's supposed to, according to experts. They advise trying to avoid painkillers in order to ensure the strongest possible immune response.